est1892

est1892 (https://www.est1892.co.uk/forums/index.php)
-   Liverpool FC (https://www.est1892.co.uk/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=2)
-   -   The 'where are they now?' files (https://www.est1892.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=48217)

RedReet 30-08-17 10:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cormack74 (Post 3399460)
I'm not really getting the parrallel mate to be honest :confused:

Are we talking a heavy night on the sauce?

You seem to be saying that Reina was decent when we sold him - if you look at the posts on this page that doesn't seem to be how everyone remembered the last part of his time at the club.

I may as well clear this up as irrelevant as it is.

Wasn’t making a serious point last time, just killing a few mins in the airport.

My actual point was that people forget that Reina was pretty decent in his last season, which the stats back up, particularly towards the end of the season. Your argument that if we check the match threads from that time, ‘it will reveal it was the right thing to do’, seems bizarre to me. Fans talk shit, myself included, particularly in match threads and more often than not we are wrong. Pepe was crap for two seasons, no denying that, but when we actually got rid of him he was playing quite well and was still relatively young for a GK. There are no guarantees that he wouldn’t have went to shit again the following season and Mignolet started the year off quite well, winning us some vital points, but equally I think people exaggerate how bad he actually was.

I actually forgot we sent him to Napoli on loan for a year, before the Bayern move, which makes it even worse. It’s not the worst decision the club ever made, far from it and I accept why the club did it, but I felt then just as I do now that it was a mistake.


Anyway, as I said, it’s irrelevant now. Mig has improved and there are much more important things going on at the club at the minute.

Yozza 30-08-17 01:56 PM

http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/sport...ol-10-13546774

Bit of an eye opener although explains a lot.....


Paul Stewart - I signed for Liverpool with 10 empty lager bottles on the table

Former football star reveals astonishing battle with booze and drugs after pain of child abuse

To millions of football fans, it must have looked like I had it all.

Playing alongside legends like Gary Lineker, Paul Gascoigne, and Chris Waddle, I had just been picked for England.

Scoring a goal in an FA Cup final to cap a man-of-the-match display was the stuff dreams are made of.

Yet I was starting to self-*destruct due to the pain of childhood abuse, taking drink and drugs to block out the past.

Liverpool forked out £2.5million to buy me. At 27, they should have been getting a man at the peak of his powers. An international with a proven track record; a midfielder with a boundless work-rate and an eye for goals.

At current prices, the transfer value would be in the region of £19m. But I sold them short. I sold myself short.

At Spurs, you were not supposed to be on the booze 48 hours before a game – I never quite managed to abide by that.

By the time Liverpool manager Graeme Souness came in with an offer which Spurs could not refuse, drugs had become a regular habit. Even the weekend I agreed the deal, the temptation of another bender proved too much.

We were on tour when Terry Venables told me Liverpool’s bid had been accepted. I already knew – word reached you back then, as it so often does now.

Liverpool were one of the biggest clubs in the world and I would have crawled over broken glass to play in that red shirt.

I met Souness in an airport hotel and, because I did not have an agent, did all the negotiations myself. When I’d got to Heathrow, I’d gone straight to the hotel bar. By the time Graeme turned up, I had a table full of empty Holsten Pils bottles.

Many months later he told me: ‘You have a reputation as a bit of a drinker.’ I was thinking: ‘When you signed me I had about 10 empty lager bottles on the table. Didn’t you notice?’

They eventually agreed to pay me £10,000 a week with a £100,000 signing-on fee spread over 12 months, though Souness was as tough in negotiations as he had been in the tackle during his playing days.

Spurs were making a clear £800,000 profit – big money in those days. As I had not asked for a transfer they agreed to pay up my contract, which amounted to about £200,000 after tax.

Instead of heading home to Blackpool after meeting Souness, I went straight into old London town. A few drinks turned into yet another all-night bender – I was boozing heavily until the early hours, and taking Ecstasy and cocaine.

I remember falling out of a club as dawn broke, the first light *hitting my eyes as I emerged from the darkness of yet another *cavernous dance-floor.

Drink and drugs left me staggering through the West End, past Covent Garden, past Charing Cross Station, right in the heart of London.

It was as quiet as you are ever likely to see it, its taxi ranks empty save for a few pigeons, no-one around the entrance to the station or the hotel.

It wasn’t long after 5am when I saw a tramp who said to me: ‘Aren’t you Paul Stewart?’ News of the £2.5m move to Liverpool was already out. I recall a London *billboard proclaiming: ‘Stewart set for Liverpool.’

There was a second’s hesitation but there was no point in denying it so I answered: ‘Yes I am, mate.’ Perhaps the newspaper hoarding had made him *wonder if it really could be me.

It was a far better story than the transfer – the down-and-out on the streets of London. The England footballer, the cup-final hero, high on drugs and booze, wandering around at dawn in the midst of a £2.5m transfer. Even the tramp must have thought: ‘Why is he still out drinking at this hour of the *morning?’

But beyond that look of astonishment he never said another word. I can still see him there, shaking his head.

It was not a great start to the biggest move of my footballing career, but a sign of things to come. I should have known better but I was becoming gripped by addiction and I hadn’t learned lessons from all those near-misses in the past.

Like the cops finding me in a club with cocaine but letting me go. Like the PFA dinner when the England coach pulled up as we fell out of a cab. And like *numerous random drug tests at the Spurs training ground when my name did not come out of the hat.

I was pushing my luck. I knew that when I was asked to travel north for the medical. It all went fine until they asked for a urine sample. In a panic about the drugs in my system, I had to say to the Liverpool club doctor: ‘I’m really sorry but I cannot seem to pee.’

Suddenly it hit home. I could get caught. The drugs will show up. What have I done?

It was a rare moment of doubt for me. I could feel the hairs standing up on the back of my neck as I thought I was *finally going to get caught.

To my astonishment, the *doctor said ‘no trouble at all’ and just asked me to come back at a later date. There followed two hard days of training back in Blackpool to sweat as much out of my system as possible before I returned to Anfield.

I lost about seven or eight pounds in a couple of days, working like a slave with long runs on the beach

Even 48 hours later, there was still that nagging worry something might show up. A positive drugs test could mean an all-out ban from football.

When I returned to Anfield, they dipped a couple of sticks into the urine sample.

The Liverpool doctor explained they were looking for diabetes and testing kidney function. And nothing else.

I am not a fan of Souness because of the way he was with me. I found him arrogant, ignorant even. I did not think he was a very good man-manager.

But there is no-one but myself to blame for my lack of success at Liverpool.

It remains the biggest regret of my footballing career.

After watching the great *Liverpool teams in the past, I knew nothing but constant struggle with Souness.

We had a thing called ‘weigh-in day’ when he used to check players were not over-eating.

There were some characters in the squad and players like Ian Rush, Steve Nicol, and John Barnes did not always take too kindly to being treated like schoolboys.

Graeme did not seem to get that at times.

Neither he, nor any of the players, knew about my drugs habit. When I look back, I was taking so many risks, even after what I thought was a close call when I signed for Liverpool.

I never took drugs in front of anyone but I could not stop. I was addicted.

I managed just one league goal for Liverpool, against *Sheffield United on my dream Anfield debut.

The roar of the Kop as it went in stays with me still, as does the noise as you lined up in the tunnel with that famous ‘This is Anfield’ sign right in front of you. You could see fear in the eyes of the opposition.

Liverpool of course had been in their pomp in the late 80s, dominating the league, winning the Double.

But that debut goal was to be my last for 24 league games.

When Souness clashed with me in front of all the players, I knew the writing was on the wall in big letters.

It was around 1993, about a year into my time at the club, and it was already becoming clear that I was not in the *manager’s plans.

There was no coaching for me. There were some brilliant young players coming through, the so-called Spice Boys of Robbie Fowler, Don Hutchison, Steve McManaman and Jamie Redknapp.

The staff all knew they had a big future and so they would be working on their game all the time. With me, they just used to throw me a shirt.

I played for the reserves at Southport on a regular basis, and there would be a crowd of 500 shouting all kinds of abuse. Unlike in the big games at *Anfield with the buzz from the stands, you could hear every word of criticism.

It was the lowest point of my football career. The only release was going out, drinking and taking more drugs. It was a vicious spiral. I came off the coke and I was more depressed than ever.

Come the 1995-96 season, when Peter Reid came in for me at Sunderland, I could not wait to get away from Anfield. I knew it was the last chance for me.

I had to get clean, stay fit, and stop taking drugs...

Cormack74 30-08-17 03:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RedReet (Post 3401781)
I may as well clear this up as irrelevant as it is.

Wasn’t making a serious point last time, just killing a few mins in the airport.

My actual point was that people forget that Reina was pretty decent in his last season, which the stats back up, particularly towards the end of the season. Your argument that if we check the match threads from that time, ‘it will reveal it was the right thing to do’, seems bizarre to me. Fans talk shit, myself included, particularly in match threads and more often than not we are wrong. Pepe was crap for two seasons, no denying that, but when we actually got rid of him he was playing quite well and was still relatively young for a GK. There are no guarantees that he wouldn’t have went to shit again the following season and Mignolet started the year off quite well, winning us some vital points, but equally I think people exaggerate how bad he actually was.

I actually forgot we sent him to Napoli on loan for a year, before the Bayern move, which makes it even worse. It’s not the worst decision the club ever made, far from it and I accept why the club did it, but I felt then just as I do now that it was a mistake.


Anyway, as I said, it’s irrelevant now. Mig has improved and there are much more important things going on at the club at the minute.



I think pretty much everyone on here rated him until the end, he just reached a point where he wasn't very good eventually. He's obviously picked up since.

Shaggy 03-09-17 07:24 PM

Hair

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DI0bgypXoAYQApt.jpg:large

baitman 03-09-17 08:50 PM

Nice pout.

dan perkins gets a stiffy :hug:

dom9 03-09-17 09:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yozza (Post 3401996)
http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/sport...ol-10-13546774

Bit of an eye opener although explains a lot.....


Paul Stewart - I signed for Liverpool with 10 empty lager bottles on the table

Former football star reveals astonishing battle with booze and drugs after pain of child abuse

To millions of football fans, it must have looked like I had it all.

Playing alongside legends like Gary Lineker, Paul Gascoigne, and Chris Waddle, I had just been picked for England.

Scoring a goal in an FA Cup final to cap a man-of-the-match display was the stuff dreams are made of.

Yet I was starting to self-*destruct due to the pain of childhood abuse, taking drink and drugs to block out the past.

Liverpool forked out £2.5million to buy me. At 27, they should have been getting a man at the peak of his powers. An international with a proven track record; a midfielder with a boundless work-rate and an eye for goals.

At current prices, the transfer value would be in the region of £19m. But I sold them short. I sold myself short.

At Spurs, you were not supposed to be on the booze 48 hours before a game – I never quite managed to abide by that.

By the time Liverpool manager Graeme Souness came in with an offer which Spurs could not refuse, drugs had become a regular habit. Even the weekend I agreed the deal, the temptation of another bender proved too much.

We were on tour when Terry Venables told me Liverpool’s bid had been accepted. I already knew – word reached you back then, as it so often does now.

Liverpool were one of the biggest clubs in the world and I would have crawled over broken glass to play in that red shirt.

I met Souness in an airport hotel and, because I did not have an agent, did all the negotiations myself. When I’d got to Heathrow, I’d gone straight to the hotel bar. By the time Graeme turned up, I had a table full of empty Holsten Pils bottles.

Many months later he told me: ‘You have a reputation as a bit of a drinker.’ I was thinking: ‘When you signed me I had about 10 empty lager bottles on the table. Didn’t you notice?’

They eventually agreed to pay me £10,000 a week with a £100,000 signing-on fee spread over 12 months, though Souness was as tough in negotiations as he had been in the tackle during his playing days.

Spurs were making a clear £800,000 profit – big money in those days. As I had not asked for a transfer they agreed to pay up my contract, which amounted to about £200,000 after tax.

Instead of heading home to Blackpool after meeting Souness, I went straight into old London town. A few drinks turned into yet another all-night bender – I was boozing heavily until the early hours, and taking Ecstasy and cocaine.

I remember falling out of a club as dawn broke, the first light *hitting my eyes as I emerged from the darkness of yet another *cavernous dance-floor.

Drink and drugs left me staggering through the West End, past Covent Garden, past Charing Cross Station, right in the heart of London.

It was as quiet as you are ever likely to see it, its taxi ranks empty save for a few pigeons, no-one around the entrance to the station or the hotel.

It wasn’t long after 5am when I saw a tramp who said to me: ‘Aren’t you Paul Stewart?’ News of the £2.5m move to Liverpool was already out. I recall a London *billboard proclaiming: ‘Stewart set for Liverpool.’

There was a second’s hesitation but there was no point in denying it so I answered: ‘Yes I am, mate.’ Perhaps the newspaper hoarding had made him *wonder if it really could be me.

It was a far better story than the transfer – the down-and-out on the streets of London. The England footballer, the cup-final hero, high on drugs and booze, wandering around at dawn in the midst of a £2.5m transfer. Even the tramp must have thought: ‘Why is he still out drinking at this hour of the *morning?’

But beyond that look of astonishment he never said another word. I can still see him there, shaking his head.

It was not a great start to the biggest move of my footballing career, but a sign of things to come. I should have known better but I was becoming gripped by addiction and I hadn’t learned lessons from all those near-misses in the past.

Like the cops finding me in a club with cocaine but letting me go. Like the PFA dinner when the England coach pulled up as we fell out of a cab. And like *numerous random drug tests at the Spurs training ground when my name did not come out of the hat.

I was pushing my luck. I knew that when I was asked to travel north for the medical. It all went fine until they asked for a urine sample. In a panic about the drugs in my system, I had to say to the Liverpool club doctor: ‘I’m really sorry but I cannot seem to pee.’

Suddenly it hit home. I could get caught. The drugs will show up. What have I done?

It was a rare moment of doubt for me. I could feel the hairs standing up on the back of my neck as I thought I was *finally going to get caught.

To my astonishment, the *doctor said ‘no trouble at all’ and just asked me to come back at a later date. There followed two hard days of training back in Blackpool to sweat as much out of my system as possible before I returned to Anfield.

I lost about seven or eight pounds in a couple of days, working like a slave with long runs on the beach

Even 48 hours later, there was still that nagging worry something might show up. A positive drugs test could mean an all-out ban from football.

When I returned to Anfield, they dipped a couple of sticks into the urine sample.

The Liverpool doctor explained they were looking for diabetes and testing kidney function. And nothing else.

I am not a fan of Souness because of the way he was with me. I found him arrogant, ignorant even. I did not think he was a very good man-manager.

But there is no-one but myself to blame for my lack of success at Liverpool.

It remains the biggest regret of my footballing career.

After watching the great *Liverpool teams in the past, I knew nothing but constant struggle with Souness.

We had a thing called ‘weigh-in day’ when he used to check players were not over-eating.

There were some characters in the squad and players like Ian Rush, Steve Nicol, and John Barnes did not always take too kindly to being treated like schoolboys.

Graeme did not seem to get that at times.

Neither he, nor any of the players, knew about my drugs habit. When I look back, I was taking so many risks, even after what I thought was a close call when I signed for Liverpool.

I never took drugs in front of anyone but I could not stop. I was addicted.

I managed just one league goal for Liverpool, against *Sheffield United on my dream Anfield debut.

The roar of the Kop as it went in stays with me still, as does the noise as you lined up in the tunnel with that famous ‘This is Anfield’ sign right in front of you. You could see fear in the eyes of the opposition.

Liverpool of course had been in their pomp in the late 80s, dominating the league, winning the Double.

But that debut goal was to be my last for 24 league games.

When Souness clashed with me in front of all the players, I knew the writing was on the wall in big letters.

It was around 1993, about a year into my time at the club, and it was already becoming clear that I was not in the *manager’s plans.

There was no coaching for me. There were some brilliant young players coming through, the so-called Spice Boys of Robbie Fowler, Don Hutchison, Steve McManaman and Jamie Redknapp.

The staff all knew they had a big future and so they would be working on their game all the time. With me, they just used to throw me a shirt.

I played for the reserves at Southport on a regular basis, and there would be a crowd of 500 shouting all kinds of abuse. Unlike in the big games at *Anfield with the buzz from the stands, you could hear every word of criticism.

It was the lowest point of my football career. The only release was going out, drinking and taking more drugs. It was a vicious spiral. I came off the coke and I was more depressed than ever.

Come the 1995-96 season, when Peter Reid came in for me at Sunderland, I could not wait to get away from Anfield. I knew it was the last chance for me.

I had to get clean, stay fit, and stop taking drugs...

Crumbs.

Shaggy 06-09-17 10:44 AM

Blimey. Retired.


SB 06-09-17 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shaggy (Post 3405570)

Must of been hell for him.

Fernandinho 06-09-17 12:59 PM

Wow I can't believe that was so well kept off the radar. Poor guy...

HamboCairns 06-09-17 02:03 PM

This revelation has made us all look like a bunch of wankers.

Gingawaria 06-09-17 02:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yozza (Post 3401996)
http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/sport...ol-10-13546774

Bit of an eye opener although explains a lot.....


Paul Stewart - I signed for Liverpool with 10 empty lager bottles on the table

Former football star reveals astonishing battle with booze and drugs after pain of child abuse

To millions of football fans, it must have looked like I had it all.

Playing alongside legends like Gary Lineker, Paul Gascoigne, and Chris Waddle, I had just been picked for England.

Scoring a goal in an FA Cup final to cap a man-of-the-match display was the stuff dreams are made of.

Yet I was starting to self-*destruct due to the pain of childhood abuse, taking drink and drugs to block out the past.

Liverpool forked out £2.5million to buy me. At 27, they should have been getting a man at the peak of his powers. An international with a proven track record; a midfielder with a boundless work-rate and an eye for goals.

At current prices, the transfer value would be in the region of £19m. But I sold them short. I sold myself short.

At Spurs, you were not supposed to be on the booze 48 hours before a game – I never quite managed to abide by that.

By the time Liverpool manager Graeme Souness came in with an offer which Spurs could not refuse, drugs had become a regular habit. Even the weekend I agreed the deal, the temptation of another bender proved too much.

We were on tour when Terry Venables told me Liverpool’s bid had been accepted. I already knew – word reached you back then, as it so often does now.

Liverpool were one of the biggest clubs in the world and I would have crawled over broken glass to play in that red shirt.

I met Souness in an airport hotel and, because I did not have an agent, did all the negotiations myself. When I’d got to Heathrow, I’d gone straight to the hotel bar. By the time Graeme turned up, I had a table full of empty Holsten Pils bottles.

Many months later he told me: ‘You have a reputation as a bit of a drinker.’ I was thinking: ‘When you signed me I had about 10 empty lager bottles on the table. Didn’t you notice?’

They eventually agreed to pay me £10,000 a week with a £100,000 signing-on fee spread over 12 months, though Souness was as tough in negotiations as he had been in the tackle during his playing days.

Spurs were making a clear £800,000 profit – big money in those days. As I had not asked for a transfer they agreed to pay up my contract, which amounted to about £200,000 after tax.

Instead of heading home to Blackpool after meeting Souness, I went straight into old London town. A few drinks turned into yet another all-night bender – I was boozing heavily until the early hours, and taking Ecstasy and cocaine.

I remember falling out of a club as dawn broke, the first light *hitting my eyes as I emerged from the darkness of yet another *cavernous dance-floor.

Drink and drugs left me staggering through the West End, past Covent Garden, past Charing Cross Station, right in the heart of London.

It was as quiet as you are ever likely to see it, its taxi ranks empty save for a few pigeons, no-one around the entrance to the station or the hotel.

It wasn’t long after 5am when I saw a tramp who said to me: ‘Aren’t you Paul Stewart?’ News of the £2.5m move to Liverpool was already out. I recall a London *billboard proclaiming: ‘Stewart set for Liverpool.’

There was a second’s hesitation but there was no point in denying it so I answered: ‘Yes I am, mate.’ Perhaps the newspaper hoarding had made him *wonder if it really could be me.

It was a far better story than the transfer – the down-and-out on the streets of London. The England footballer, the cup-final hero, high on drugs and booze, wandering around at dawn in the midst of a £2.5m transfer. Even the tramp must have thought: ‘Why is he still out drinking at this hour of the *morning?’

But beyond that look of astonishment he never said another word. I can still see him there, shaking his head.

It was not a great start to the biggest move of my footballing career, but a sign of things to come. I should have known better but I was becoming gripped by addiction and I hadn’t learned lessons from all those near-misses in the past.

Like the cops finding me in a club with cocaine but letting me go. Like the PFA dinner when the England coach pulled up as we fell out of a cab. And like *numerous random drug tests at the Spurs training ground when my name did not come out of the hat.

I was pushing my luck. I knew that when I was asked to travel north for the medical. It all went fine until they asked for a urine sample. In a panic about the drugs in my system, I had to say to the Liverpool club doctor: ‘I’m really sorry but I cannot seem to pee.’

Suddenly it hit home. I could get caught. The drugs will show up. What have I done?

It was a rare moment of doubt for me. I could feel the hairs standing up on the back of my neck as I thought I was *finally going to get caught.

To my astonishment, the *doctor said ‘no trouble at all’ and just asked me to come back at a later date. There followed two hard days of training back in Blackpool to sweat as much out of my system as possible before I returned to Anfield.

I lost about seven or eight pounds in a couple of days, working like a slave with long runs on the beach

Even 48 hours later, there was still that nagging worry something might show up. A positive drugs test could mean an all-out ban from football.

When I returned to Anfield, they dipped a couple of sticks into the urine sample.

The Liverpool doctor explained they were looking for diabetes and testing kidney function. And nothing else.

I am not a fan of Souness because of the way he was with me. I found him arrogant, ignorant even. I did not think he was a very good man-manager.

But there is no-one but myself to blame for my lack of success at Liverpool.

It remains the biggest regret of my footballing career.

After watching the great *Liverpool teams in the past, I knew nothing but constant struggle with Souness.

We had a thing called ‘weigh-in day’ when he used to check players were not over-eating.

There were some characters in the squad and players like Ian Rush, Steve Nicol, and John Barnes did not always take too kindly to being treated like schoolboys.

Graeme did not seem to get that at times.

Neither he, nor any of the players, knew about my drugs habit. When I look back, I was taking so many risks, even after what I thought was a close call when I signed for Liverpool.

I never took drugs in front of anyone but I could not stop. I was addicted.

I managed just one league goal for Liverpool, against *Sheffield United on my dream Anfield debut.

The roar of the Kop as it went in stays with me still, as does the noise as you lined up in the tunnel with that famous ‘This is Anfield’ sign right in front of you. You could see fear in the eyes of the opposition.

Liverpool of course had been in their pomp in the late 80s, dominating the league, winning the Double.

But that debut goal was to be my last for 24 league games.

When Souness clashed with me in front of all the players, I knew the writing was on the wall in big letters.

It was around 1993, about a year into my time at the club, and it was already becoming clear that I was not in the *manager’s plans.

There was no coaching for me. There were some brilliant young players coming through, the so-called Spice Boys of Robbie Fowler, Don Hutchison, Steve McManaman and Jamie Redknapp.

The staff all knew they had a big future and so they would be working on their game all the time. With me, they just used to throw me a shirt.

I played for the reserves at Southport on a regular basis, and there would be a crowd of 500 shouting all kinds of abuse. Unlike in the big games at *Anfield with the buzz from the stands, you could hear every word of criticism.

It was the lowest point of my football career. The only release was going out, drinking and taking more drugs. It was a vicious spiral. I came off the coke and I was more depressed than ever.

Come the 1995-96 season, when Peter Reid came in for me at Sunderland, I could not wait to get away from Anfield. I knew it was the last chance for me.

I had to get clean, stay fit, and stop taking drugs...

He owns a signage company in Blackpool these days - has no interest in football whatsoever. An old colleague of mine used to work for him, says that he had no real love of the game even when playing and that it just happened to be something he was good at.

Daniel 7 06-09-17 03:52 PM

Not surprised after what he went through as a kid

Charly 06-09-17 05:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by foresterbloke (Post 3405664)
This revelation has made us all look like a bunch of wankers.

Considering some the the stuff that gets posted about, say Sturridge and his injury problems, I would say more than some.

Paddy 07-09-17 10:23 AM

Enrique has blocked loads on Twitter...Carra, Echo journalists etc

Norbs 07-09-17 10:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gingawaria (Post 3405674)
He owns a signage company in Blackpool these days - has no interest in football whatsoever. An old colleague of mine used to work for him, says that he had no real love of the game even when playing and that it just happened to be something he was good at.

I get a few calls from a Blackpool based company that tries to sell advertising space on tvs in golf clubs, doctor's surgeries etc. I wonder if that's them!

Irishnev 14-09-17 10:05 PM


HamboCairns 14-09-17 10:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irishnev (Post 3408661)

Nah, it took a slight deflection.

Yozza 15-09-17 05:51 AM

Can't wait to click on this thread & read where Lovren is....

Pablo 15-09-17 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yozza (Post 3408715)
Can't wait to click on this thread & read where Lovren is....

Out of position probably.

Gingawaria 15-09-17 09:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Norbs (Post 3405873)
I get a few calls from a Blackpool based company that tries to sell advertising space on tvs in golf clubs, doctor's surgeries etc. I wonder if that's them!

:haha:

More than likely!

gratziani 15-09-17 11:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pablo (Post 3408728)
out of position probably.

:d:d:d:d

Buzzo 15-09-17 04:34 PM

Quote:

Kolo Toure says he "couldn't be happier" after returning to Celtic to join the club's coaching staff as a technical assistant.

Toure, 36, made 17 appearances for Celtic last season before ending his playing career to focus on coaching.

"This is a new chapter in my career, a new beginning. The football is over now," Toure told the Celtic website.

"I can officially say I am retired from playing and now I am fully concentrating on coaching."

In his new role, the former Arsenal, Liverpool and Manchester City defender will be "supporting on all first-team coaching matters" and using his knowledge to assist Celtic's various youth levels.

'Learn so much from Brendan Rodgers'

After taking up a coaching role with the Ivory Coast national set-up in the summer, Toure is relishing his coaching opportunity in the Scottish Premiership.

"For me, there is no big change in terms of what I will be doing," he said. "I have always been the kind of player who tries to help those around me.

"Now I will try to give advice, help the young players and just guide them and pass on all the experience I have acquired during my career."

Toure had gained some coaching experience in the second half of last season at Celtic and is eager for more.

"I can learn so much from working with Brendan Rodgers," he said. "He is a top manager. I will be working with him and his staff very closely each day.

"He is one of the best young managers in the world right now.

Toure made 17 appearances for Celtic before calling time on his playing career
"What he's doing for Celtic is there for all to see. He's doing amazingly right now."

Manager Rodgers said Toure was a welcome addition to his coaching staff.

"This is great news for Celtic that we are able to bring a man of Kolo's experience into our coaching team," the Celtic manager said.

"In everything he does, he is quite simply a fantastic example to anyone.

"He has worked at the top of the game for so many years and he has all the qualities which any player of any age should aspire to.

"He is a fantastic role model for our younger players and someone who has a level of experience and knowledge which can only be invaluable to our established players."

baitman 16-09-17 07:10 PM

emre can... packing his bags.

naby keita... checking the small print.

vvd... looking at houses in wilmslow.

Irishnev 26-09-17 09:24 AM


Gingawaria 26-09-17 01:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Irishnev (Post 3411554)

He's tearing it up over there - always had something about him. Shame he had to leave to realise his potential.

Charly 26-09-17 02:15 PM

I dont think he was really given a chance here, or a run in the team. Replacement for Coutinho?

Kenneth 26-09-17 02:36 PM

Nope

Slinky Skills 26-09-17 06:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenneth (Post 3411651)
Nope

:haha:

Charly 26-09-17 07:29 PM

Iol... I was not being serious.

baitman 27-09-17 12:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Charly (Post 3411705)
Iol... I was not being serious.

if you are going to try and bluff your way out of it you should provide an escape clause via the use of white text like i do...

:source:

Fivex 27-09-17 12:34 AM

:haha: :handshake:

Of course it was a serious suggestion :D and it wasn't exactly the most ridiculous idea someone's had on here. It's not Brian McBride-esque, no need to backtrack :haha:

Paddy 27-09-17 08:54 PM

Coates with a goal for Barcelona


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Yozza 28-09-17 09:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paddy (Post 3412180)
coates with a goal for barcelona


sent from my iphone using tapatalk

og ;)

Charly 28-09-17 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fivex (Post 3411992)
:haha: :handshake:

Of course it was a serious suggestion :D and it wasn't exactly the most ridiculous idea someone's had on here. It's not Brian McBride-esque, no need to backtrack :haha:

I feel this is not one I am going to win.

So I will carry this one, knowing there will be far greater shames to come...

baitman 02-10-17 05:29 PM

rickie lambert has announced his retirement

SB 05-10-17 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by baitman (Post 3413309)
rickie lambert has announced his retirement

Thought he’d done so a few seasons back tbh. ;) you sure your not doing a Bender?

baitman 05-10-17 04:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SB (Post 3413703)
Thought he’d done so a few seasons back tbh. ;) you sure your not doing a Bender?

three days old news on bbc :crackoff:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/41471481 :wave:

even wiki is updated :p

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rickie_Lambert

brightred 06-10-17 12:06 AM

Sad to see a legend retire

brightred 06-10-17 12:07 AM

Any news about Sean Dundee??

baitman 06-10-17 12:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brightred (Post 3413785)
Any news about Sean Dundee??

probably getting a game for billericay town with some other classy cunts.



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:41 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.