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Old 07-11-19, 12:41 PM   #7241
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I'm pretty sure he isn't smiling when opposition goals go in against high profile teams in important games when we're at full strength. Much more likely to see Angry Jurgen going mental at those times.

Cup games when he selects weakened teams? I just don't think he's that arsed.
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Old 07-11-19, 03:05 PM   #7242
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Old 07-11-19, 03:06 PM   #7243
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I thik the 'forced smile' is a thing to make sure he isnt displaying any negative or defeatist vibes, any of the team look over and see him raging and screaming its a confidence killer.
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Old 08-11-19, 08:16 PM   #7244
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Old 09-11-19, 07:38 PM   #7245
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I think Jurgen is someone who loves football and doesn’t see winning or losing as more important than life or death. I think he just appreciates a good goal.
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Old 10-11-19, 07:35 PM   #7246
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Theres going to be a few scouse babies being born in early 2021 called Jurgen, about 9 months after we win this league
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Old 10-11-19, 08:32 PM   #7247
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Old 11-11-19, 09:44 AM   #7248
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From the New York Times football correspondent, Rory Smith, focused on Klopp's coaching impact

At Liverpool, Another Symphony Brings the Crowd to Its Feet
Liverpool overpowered Manchester City with style and substance, opening an eight-point lead in the Premier League.


Liverpool’s 3-1 victory over Manchester City gave it an eight-point lead in the Premier League standings.

By Rory Smith
Nov. 10, 2019

LIVERPOOL, England — Jürgen Klopp and Jordan Henderson were the last two figures on the field. Manchester City’s players and staff members had applauded their fans, tucked away at one end of Anfield. Most of Liverpool’s had lingered longer, though only a little, to bask in the adulation of their public.

Now, though, it was just manager and captain, approaching the Kop, still in raucous voice, sufficiently energized that one might think Liverpool had just won a cup in springtime, rather than a league game — the 12th of 38 — played out in a biting winter chill.

Klopp raised his hands in thanks, then turned to leave. That was not enough for the television cameraman tracking his every move, though. There is a cliché shot of Klopp, one that tends to feature after every significant Liverpool victory: the German manager pumping his fists, one, two, three times, as the Kop cheers.

It is an image that neatly conveys the idea that Klopp is the bandmaster and Liverpool’s fans his orchestra: He sets the rhythm, and they play the tune. That was the shot the cameraman wanted, and the shot Klopp seemed to be denying him.

And so, wordlessly, he indicated to Klopp that he had forgotten something: three times the cameraman pumped his fists, as if to remind the Liverpool manager of his postmatch routine. This, here, was an image that neatly captured something, too: the relationship not between manager and fans, but between television and the sport it covers, where the medium controls the stories that are told.

Klopp looked faintly baffled at first, and then — reading his body language — a little angry. He made it clear that he was not going to perform for anyone, that he was not going to be taking instructions on how to celebrate the most important victory of Liverpool’s season so far, the most important victory since the Champions League final in June. He turned his back on the camera, to face his people once more.

Since Klopp arrived in England there has been a tendency to characterize him as, essentially, just a motivator: a megawatt smile and a bearhug, a shouter and bellower, a fist pumper and chest beater. Where his Manchester City counterpart, Pep Guardiola, for example, is seen as a tactical mastermind and philosopher, his eccentricity read as a sign that he understands soccer at some deeper level than everyone else, there are those who see Klopp as nothing more than a cheerleader.

That is the role he is expected to perform. It is what that shot of him, conducting the fans in the Kop, serves to reinforce. It leads to a conception of his Liverpool team as nothing more than effort and energy, a squadron of foot soldiers whipped up into a frenzy by the demagogue who commands them, garnished by three freewheeling attackers of prodigious improvisational brilliance.

It is time, perhaps, to address that conception. Liverpool does not sit eight points clear at the top of the Premier League, and nine ahead of Manchester City, the back-to-back reigning champion, because of Klopp’s charisma. It is not European champion because it is more motivated than all of its rivals.

It is not unbeaten at home in more than two years because Sadio Mané, Mohamed Salah and Roberto Firmino are enough to make up for a team that has little to recommend it beyond effort and application; it has not lost just one game in its last 52, or beaten a City team that is widely regarded as one of the best in history, 3-1, because Klopp can get the crowd riled up.

If any of that were true, Guardiola himself would not regard Liverpool as “the best team in the world right now,” its presence as “the greatest challenge” he has faced as a manager, or Anfield as “the most difficult stadium” in the world for any visiting team. He certainly would not — as he admitted in a talk at the University of Liverpool last year — find that he could not concentrate on reading a book because his thoughts kept turning to “Jürgen Klopp and Liverpool.”

Liverpool has not been turned into such a fearsome opponent by Klopp’s clever use of hugging. Liverpool is not, contrary both to popular perception and its own self-assessment, a team built on and driven by emotion. It is far more scientific than that. More than anything, what this Liverpool team has become — and what it may yet develop into — is a triumph of coaching.

It would be easy to see Sunday’s result and assume that City played badly, or that Liverpool was inspired, but that would not be the truth. The visitors were, as afternoon drifted into night, slicker and quicker and brighter. When Guardiola said he was “proud” of how his team had played, when he intimated he could not have asked for anything more from his players, he was not sugarcoating a bitter defeat. He had every reason to believe that his team came to Anfield and did all he asked.


The problem was that every aspect of Liverpool’s play is drilled with intense precision. Guardiola highlighted its set pieces, not only the corners and free kicks but the throw-ins, for which the club employs a specialist coach. He mentioned how, when a team sits back, Liverpool expertly opens the play through its fullbacks, Trent Alexander-Arnold and Andy Robertson, to create space.

He talked about the way Liverpool’s players pour into the penalty area. “Not just Mané and Salah and Firmino,” he said, but the midfielders, too: Henderson and Georginio Wijnaldum. It is not aimless running, either. “They arrive at exactly the right tempo,” Guardiola said. “It is almost impossible to live with this situation.”

And when an attack breaks down, in that moment of confusion and chaos that everyone in soccer now calls the “transition,” Liverpool melts back into its defensive shape seamlessly. “They are incredible going backward,” Guardiola said. Klopp’s team regroups, rejoins, and then starts hunting the ball again, ready to pounce on the counterattack.


That is not left to chance, either: Liverpool’s fabled front three are not given free rein to interpret attacks as they see fit. They run in set patterns, in predetermined directions, the fluidity that seems to come so naturally a product of intense work on the training ground. The very best teams — and this applies to City, too — do not really go in for freestyling. Everything, even attacking patterns, is planned.

With City, that has been obvious for some time; Guardiola’s team even has a signature goal, one that ordinarily ends with a cutback from Raheem Sterling for Sergio Agüero to tap in, that represents the culmination of all its coach’s hard work.

Increasingly, though, Liverpool does, too: one fullback switching the ball across the field to the other, a cross swinging in, three or four or five attackers speeding into different areas of the box to meet it. It reached its apex, perhaps, with Liverpool’s second goal here: Alexander-Arnold picking out Robertson from across the field; Robertson taking a touch, and finding the run of Salah. “I don’t think I ever saw a goal like that,” Klopp said.

It looked so natural that it was effortless. There is a tendency, in sports, to ascribe everything that seems easy to the virtuosity of the performers: to Alexander-Arnold’s natural vision, to Robertson’s accuracy, to a coolheadedness that Salah just happens to have.

It is a romantic story, an appealing one, one we can readily understand. The truth is less magical, less mystical. It is that Liverpool has practiced all of the component parts of that move again and again; that Klopp has drilled his players so intensely that he has reprogrammed their instincts.

It is tempting to think that Liverpool is soaring because of the man pumping his fist in front of the Kop, roaring his satisfaction, rousing them to war. It is soaring instead because of a man quietly plotting every aspect of his team’s performance, tuning his players to his needs. He is more strategist than motivator. It is just a shame that side of him is so much harder to capture on film.
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Old 11-11-19, 02:25 PM   #7249
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From F365's 16 Conclusions

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16) Liverpool are happily breathing theirs (re: air of invincibility) , proof that winning can become a self-perpetuating addiction. That League Cup game against Arsenal encapsulated it perfectly: losing by two goals on three separate occasions with a team comprised almost entirely of youngsters and designated drivers Milner and Adam Lallana, they simply found a way.

Lovren summed it up on Sunday. He blocked as many shots (2) as City as a whole, with five clearances thrown in for good measure. Van Dijk was typically solid but his partner, in the side after injury, still finding his rhythm and having played such a small explicit part of their recent run, was superior.

Klopp is an underrated tactician, but it is here where he undoubtedly shines. A player that was almost sold in the summer, was told he was back-up to the back-up in his position and has long been ridiculed and written off, laid the foundations for an emphatic victory over a direct title rival. That is incredible man-management.
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Old 11-11-19, 02:27 PM   #7250
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Originally Posted by Sus View Post
From the New York Times football correspondent, Rory Smith, focused on Klopp's coaching impact

At Liverpool, Another Symphony Brings the Crowd to Its Feet
Liverpool overpowered Manchester City with style and substance, opening an eight-point lead in the Premier League.


Liverpool’s 3-1 victory over Manchester City gave it an eight-point lead in the Premier League standings.

By Rory Smith
Nov. 10, 2019

LIVERPOOL, England — Jürgen Klopp and Jordan Henderson were the last two figures on the field. Manchester City’s players and staff members had applauded their fans, tucked away at one end of Anfield. Most of Liverpool’s had lingered longer, though only a little, to bask in the adulation of their public.

Now, though, it was just manager and captain, approaching the Kop, still in raucous voice, sufficiently energized that one might think Liverpool had just won a cup in springtime, rather than a league game — the 12th of 38 — played out in a biting winter chill.

Klopp raised his hands in thanks, then turned to leave. That was not enough for the television cameraman tracking his every move, though. There is a cliché shot of Klopp, one that tends to feature after every significant Liverpool victory: the German manager pumping his fists, one, two, three times, as the Kop cheers.

It is an image that neatly conveys the idea that Klopp is the bandmaster and Liverpool’s fans his orchestra: He sets the rhythm, and they play the tune. That was the shot the cameraman wanted, and the shot Klopp seemed to be denying him.

And so, wordlessly, he indicated to Klopp that he had forgotten something: three times the cameraman pumped his fists, as if to remind the Liverpool manager of his postmatch routine. This, here, was an image that neatly captured something, too: the relationship not between manager and fans, but between television and the sport it covers, where the medium controls the stories that are told.

Klopp looked faintly baffled at first, and then — reading his body language — a little angry. He made it clear that he was not going to perform for anyone, that he was not going to be taking instructions on how to celebrate the most important victory of Liverpool’s season so far, the most important victory since the Champions League final in June. He turned his back on the camera, to face his people once more.

Since Klopp arrived in England there has been a tendency to characterize him as, essentially, just a motivator: a megawatt smile and a bearhug, a shouter and bellower, a fist pumper and chest beater. Where his Manchester City counterpart, Pep Guardiola, for example, is seen as a tactical mastermind and philosopher, his eccentricity read as a sign that he understands soccer at some deeper level than everyone else, there are those who see Klopp as nothing more than a cheerleader.

That is the role he is expected to perform. It is what that shot of him, conducting the fans in the Kop, serves to reinforce. It leads to a conception of his Liverpool team as nothing more than effort and energy, a squadron of foot soldiers whipped up into a frenzy by the demagogue who commands them, garnished by three freewheeling attackers of prodigious improvisational brilliance.

It is time, perhaps, to address that conception. Liverpool does not sit eight points clear at the top of the Premier League, and nine ahead of Manchester City, the back-to-back reigning champion, because of Klopp’s charisma. It is not European champion because it is more motivated than all of its rivals.

It is not unbeaten at home in more than two years because Sadio Mané, Mohamed Salah and Roberto Firmino are enough to make up for a team that has little to recommend it beyond effort and application; it has not lost just one game in its last 52, or beaten a City team that is widely regarded as one of the best in history, 3-1, because Klopp can get the crowd riled up.

If any of that were true, Guardiola himself would not regard Liverpool as “the best team in the world right now,” its presence as “the greatest challenge” he has faced as a manager, or Anfield as “the most difficult stadium” in the world for any visiting team. He certainly would not — as he admitted in a talk at the University of Liverpool last year — find that he could not concentrate on reading a book because his thoughts kept turning to “Jürgen Klopp and Liverpool.”

Liverpool has not been turned into such a fearsome opponent by Klopp’s clever use of hugging. Liverpool is not, contrary both to popular perception and its own self-assessment, a team built on and driven by emotion. It is far more scientific than that. More than anything, what this Liverpool team has become — and what it may yet develop into — is a triumph of coaching.

It would be easy to see Sunday’s result and assume that City played badly, or that Liverpool was inspired, but that would not be the truth. The visitors were, as afternoon drifted into night, slicker and quicker and brighter. When Guardiola said he was “proud” of how his team had played, when he intimated he could not have asked for anything more from his players, he was not sugarcoating a bitter defeat. He had every reason to believe that his team came to Anfield and did all he asked.


The problem was that every aspect of Liverpool’s play is drilled with intense precision. Guardiola highlighted its set pieces, not only the corners and free kicks but the throw-ins, for which the club employs a specialist coach. He mentioned how, when a team sits back, Liverpool expertly opens the play through its fullbacks, Trent Alexander-Arnold and Andy Robertson, to create space.

He talked about the way Liverpool’s players pour into the penalty area. “Not just Mané and Salah and Firmino,” he said, but the midfielders, too: Henderson and Georginio Wijnaldum. It is not aimless running, either. “They arrive at exactly the right tempo,” Guardiola said. “It is almost impossible to live with this situation.”

And when an attack breaks down, in that moment of confusion and chaos that everyone in soccer now calls the “transition,” Liverpool melts back into its defensive shape seamlessly. “They are incredible going backward,” Guardiola said. Klopp’s team regroups, rejoins, and then starts hunting the ball again, ready to pounce on the counterattack.


That is not left to chance, either: Liverpool’s fabled front three are not given free rein to interpret attacks as they see fit. They run in set patterns, in predetermined directions, the fluidity that seems to come so naturally a product of intense work on the training ground. The very best teams — and this applies to City, too — do not really go in for freestyling. Everything, even attacking patterns, is planned.

With City, that has been obvious for some time; Guardiola’s team even has a signature goal, one that ordinarily ends with a cutback from Raheem Sterling for Sergio Agüero to tap in, that represents the culmination of all its coach’s hard work.

Increasingly, though, Liverpool does, too: one fullback switching the ball across the field to the other, a cross swinging in, three or four or five attackers speeding into different areas of the box to meet it. It reached its apex, perhaps, with Liverpool’s second goal here: Alexander-Arnold picking out Robertson from across the field; Robertson taking a touch, and finding the run of Salah. “I don’t think I ever saw a goal like that,” Klopp said.

It looked so natural that it was effortless. There is a tendency, in sports, to ascribe everything that seems easy to the virtuosity of the performers: to Alexander-Arnold’s natural vision, to Robertson’s accuracy, to a coolheadedness that Salah just happens to have.

It is a romantic story, an appealing one, one we can readily understand. The truth is less magical, less mystical. It is that Liverpool has practiced all of the component parts of that move again and again; that Klopp has drilled his players so intensely that he has reprogrammed their instincts.

It is tempting to think that Liverpool is soaring because of the man pumping his fist in front of the Kop, roaring his satisfaction, rousing them to war. It is soaring instead because of a man quietly plotting every aspect of his team’s performance, tuning his players to his needs. He is more strategist than motivator. It is just a shame that side of him is so much harder to capture on film.
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Old 11-11-19, 03:14 PM   #7251
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Guardiola is obviously brilliant and has been a visionary, but Klopp's the best manager in the world isn't he?
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Old 11-11-19, 06:06 PM   #7252
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Guardiola is still all about the money he throws at his squad. Other than Phil Foden, who is there who he's spotted in the reserves and elevated to the first team? Who has he not upgraded?
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Old 11-11-19, 06:53 PM   #7253
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Guardiola is still all about the money he throws at his squad. Other than Phil Foden, who is there who he's spotted in the reserves and elevated to the first team? Who has he not upgraded?
Do you think Hodgson or Solskjaer could hit the same heights as Pep with the same budget?

He's tactically head, shoulders, knees and toes ahead of pretty much any other Premier League manger (Klopp aside obvs, maybe Rodgers).

He's got the two highest points totals in English league history. Blackburn, Chelsea, United and us have never come close to those totals despite at various times out spending everyone else. We managed it last season.


Along with Klopp, he's redefined football and it's no coincidence that the trend is for everyone else (Hodgson and Solskjaer aside, obvs) to be now moving towards possession and pressing based football.
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Old 11-11-19, 10:00 PM   #7254
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Need to get him resigned asap - 2022 is way to close..
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Old 11-11-19, 10:44 PM   #7255
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Old 11-11-19, 10:52 PM   #7256
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Old 11-11-19, 11:25 PM   #7257
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Great man.

Maybe it's the Jameson talking, but the pessimist is me just comes out every now and then and completely freaks out at the thought of Liverpool not being led by him - an admittedly simple summary that he would no doubt disagree with.
I mean it's not like we havent had great men in the past at the helm, but there's just something so special about this man and the culture he's.....not exactly inspired, as it's always been there.....but, reinforced, for lack of a better word.....made bulletproof, would be better, that it really is a special era that needs, and deserves to be rewarded with silverware.

It'll be a very sad day when he decides to leave.
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Old 11-11-19, 11:57 PM   #7258
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Yeah I agree, will be heartbreaking if he leaves in 2022. He needs to stay for 10 more and be immortal
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Old 12-11-19, 12:11 AM   #7259
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I'm pretty sure he isn't smiling when opposition goals go in against high profile teams in important games when we're at full strength. Much more likely to see Angry Jurgen going mental at those times.

Cup games when he selects weakened teams? I just don't think he's that arsed.
I just watched MOTD and it's fair to say that Jurgen absolutely wasn't smiling when City scored their goal.

He went ballistic.
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Old 12-11-19, 12:30 AM   #7260
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I just watched MOTD and it's fair to say that Jurgen absolutely wasn't smiling when City scored their goal.

He went ballistic.
When the ball went out on the far side the linesman put his flag up to indicate the sub, rather than a city throw but they take it anyway. We switch off for a second and then they score from the same phase of play
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Old 12-11-19, 12:42 PM   #7261
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https://www.telegraph.co.uk/football...cruit-players/

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How Liverpool employ missile-tracking technology to recruit players and used a mathematical model to hire Jurgen Klopp

Jason Burt, chief football correspondent

11 NOVEMBER 2019 • 1:46PM

Andrew Robertson was Liverpool’s best “overlooked” signing and one reason why the club hired Jürgen Klopp was because they worked out he had been one of the “unluckiest” managers in Europe over a 10-year period, Liverpool’s director of research has said.

Ian Graham has offered a fascinating insight into the work he does including using “missile-tracking” technology to assess players and said that Mohamed Salah, whom he had urged Klopp to sign, would be worth far more than €150 million (£129m) if he were sold.

Speaking on the Freakonomics Radio podcast Graham, who runs the data analysis at Liverpool, was asked which player was his favourite “discovery signing” and talked about Robertson who arrived from relegated Hull City for £8m in 2017.

“The sort of players I really like shine through in the data but don’t naturally shine through for your typical football fan or even your typical scout,” Graham told the podcast. “He’s a sort of awkward, ungainly player or a player who has been overlooked for various other purposes. One of my favourite players is Andy Robertson who is one of the best left-backs in Europe.”

On the podcast entitled Can Britain Get Its ‘Great’ Back? Graham is one the guests interviewed by host Stephen Dubner and explained his liking of Robertson who did not start playing in the Premier League until he was 22 with a struggling Hull City side.

“Andy Robertson’s problem was his background as much as anything,” Graham said. “They [Hull] got relegated from the Premier League and he was the best young full-back in Britain at the time. He was a really strange case of a really attacking full-back playing in a really poor defensive team.”

Graham uses his background – he has a PhD in Theoretical Physics from Cambridge University – to analyse players. The Welshman, who grew up a Liverpool fan, created his own model to evaluate players and works out of the club’s Melwood training ground with his analytics team. For four years until 2012 he worked for Tottenham Hotspur before he was hired after Fenway Sports Group bought Liverpool.

Graham and his team use data on every touch that every player makes during a game, where they are on the pitch and where it happens, employing “optical tracking” which is the same technology developed by the military for tracking missiles. With this the analysts receive “25 frames per second” of where exactly every player is on the pitch during a game.

In the podcast Graham explained that one of his least favourite measures is a player’s “pass completion rate” as he argues that it often distorts in favour of players who attempt only easy passes as opposed to those who play more risky balls which have a greater chance of leading to a goal being scored.

“So some of the best passers in the game have some of the lowest pass completion percentages in the game and that’s because the risk reward pay-off is very, very skewed in football,” Graham said.

There is therefore an argument that it is very easy to “massage statistics” so that a player can achieve a high pass completion rate without actually helping his team create a goal-scoring chance.

“The passes I really love are the passes that go in behind the opposition’s defence and take four or five defenders out of the game. Those passes are really hard to make but someone who gets those passes correct half the time is a world-class attacking midfielder,” Graham explained.

Graham’s work is allied to traditional scouting with Liverpool having detailed data on hundreds of thousands of players with his team of analysts helping the “filtering” down of possible targets to be looked at. Graham does not examine video evidence or scout players himself beyond analysing the data.

That process also applies to hiring a manager with Graham playing “a small role” in pursuing Klopp in 2015 when he succeeded Brendan Rodgers. “Our owners and me and all my colleagues were huge fans of Jürgen and his Dortmund team in the early 2010s,” he said. “They played the most exciting brand of football in Europe and coming from a place really not of financial dominance. They won the German Bundesliga twice at a huge financial deficit compared to Bayern Munich and so he was always one of our dream hires as manager but his last season at Dortmund was disastrous.

"So they were in the relegation zone and the German media said: It’s all over for Dortmund. Klopp’s lost it and there’s no way back for them.'”

Graham disagreed. He created a mathematical model of every pass, shot and tackle during Klopp’s years at Dortmund to evaluate each game and how they should have ended. It showed that even in Klopp’s final season at Dortmund, when they finished seventh, they should have come second. The analysis proved that the results did not match Dortmund’s performances.

“So I analysed 10 seasons of Bundesliga performances and Dortmund were the second unluckiest team in that 10-year history. It was just some terrible luck cost Jürgen,” Graham said.

Graham said that Klopp has embraced the work that he does.

“My concern about Jürgen was his act that you see on the cameras every week was just that – an act,” he said. “And that the real person would be someone different but it really isn’t. Data analysis is something that is new and because football is a very conservative sport it’s something that is very difficult to get across.”

In the podcast Graham discussed how Klopp has embraced his work. When it came to signing Salah from Roma from £34m in 2017 Klopp had to be persuaded but, of course, the forward has been an astonishing success.

Graham was asked how much the 27-year-old would now be worth in the transfer market and said: “He’s not for sale. If we could benchmark him against a recent player that we sold which was Philippe Coutinho to Barcelona your minimum starting bid would be €150m at which point the answer would be ‘no, stop wasting our time’.”
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Old 12-11-19, 01:11 PM   #7262
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Originally Posted by dom9 View Post
Do you think Hodgson or Solskjaer could hit the same heights as Pep with the same budget?

He's tactically head, shoulders, knees and toes ahead of pretty much any other Premier League manger (Klopp aside obvs, maybe Rodgers).

He's got the two highest points totals in English league history. Blackburn, Chelsea, United and us have never come close to those totals despite at various times out spending everyone else. We managed it last season.


Along with Klopp, he's redefined football and it's no coincidence that the trend is for everyone else (Hodgson and Solskjaer aside, obvs) to be now moving towards possession and pressing based football.
No they couldnt (Roy and Ole)

Pep is an exceptional coach the system and style he implements is brilliant

The only thing I am unsure of is could he hit these heights with a significantly lower budget. I am not sure, I think his system and team with a lower budget could be up there but not consistently bagging 90+ points

Same with Klopp we have seen his evolution of the squad but its only when we spent big in the transfer market that we saw the exponential increases in terms of points
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Old 12-11-19, 01:25 PM   #7263
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Interesting that.

No arguing with science.
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Old 12-11-19, 01:40 PM   #7264
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Feel like I've read that article before. Might have been Rory Smith was basically all that plus a bit on Keita
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Old 12-11-19, 01:54 PM   #7265
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http://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/22/ma...rpool.amp.html

Absolute rip off
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Old 12-11-19, 02:37 PM   #7266
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I hadn't read that before, the churnalism in football is rampant. That's also an example for the Althetic on how to do long form.

There's been a couple of data articles on Keita. He was about number one for breaking through the lines, and also the two players for one cliche. It's a shame it hasn't worked out for him but there is a glimmer of hope that it could come good in the long term.
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Old 12-11-19, 02:55 PM   #7267
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It is a rip off but the latest one is reporting stuff Ian Graham said in a recent podcast, so they could probably get away with it on those grounds.
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Old 12-11-19, 07:18 PM   #7268
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Think I forgot to post that when it came out, but it's well worth a listen.

http://freakonomics.com/podcast/london-live/

Whole thing quite good actually - there's some stuff on Cameron's Brexit ref decision, and an interview with Sadiq Khan where he touches on being a Liverpool fan.
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Old 12-11-19, 10:13 PM   #7269
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Here is a good place I guess.....should be def one and possibly 2 more

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Old 12-11-19, 10:19 PM   #7270
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Old 12-11-19, 10:21 PM   #7271
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That is absolutely insane
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Old 13-11-19, 07:01 PM   #7272
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It would be handy if the table looks the same after the next 38 games
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Old 13-11-19, 07:45 PM   #7273
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It would be handy if the table looks the same after the next 38 games
At least 120 points on there!!
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Old Today, 07:00 PM   #7274
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From the Athletic

I love Klopp interviews and even I wained towards the end of this

Jurgen Klopp throws open the door to his Melwood office.

“Oh, if I’d known it was you, I wouldn’t have bothered having a shower,” he jokes, his booming laugh echoing down the corridor. “How’s the new job?”

The Liverpool boss is armed with a large bowl of fruit and yoghurt from the canteen. It’s mid-morning and he’s back at his desk after a week’s break in Cape Town with his wife Ulla.

Wearing a red New Balance hoodie, black tracksuit bottoms and white trainers, he looks refreshed and ready for what lies ahead as he takes a seat on one of the three cream sofas.

Klopp radiates positivity. In the space of four years he has transformed the club from one that had lost its way into the champions of Europe and the runaway Premier League leaders. No-one has had a bigger impact on Liverpool Football Club since Bill Shankly’s appointment 60 years ago.

Shrewd recruitment and the manager’s tactical acumen have been key but what’s most striking about Klopp is his man-management. Spending time in his company provides a fascinating insight into how he’s able to drain every last drop of both talent and effort from those he works with and the close bond that is fuelling their pursuit of more silverware.

“Mentality monsters” was how he described his Liverpool team towards the back end of last season and that resilience has been crucial in maintaining momentum as they look to add domestic glory to the club’s sixth European crown.

“How important is the mental side in football? It’s all, if you like,” Klopp says.

“You can have the best technical ability but if you aren’t ready to show it then you can’t make the best of it.

“It’s no different in football than it is in normal life. The first step to achieve whatever you achieve is to think you can do it. You want to do it, you want to achieve it then you have to find a way to go there.

“It’s constantly like question and answer, question and answer. Right, not right, trial and error. That’s how we do it and in football it’s no different. If you are a naturally confident person you take challenges like this. If you are naturally an insecure person then you are pretty much constantly afraid of failing.”



Liverpool, who have suffered just one defeat in their past 51 Premier League matches, keep on finding a way to win. A cherished victory over champions Manchester City prior to the international break put them eight points clear at the summit. Only Manchester United in 1993-94 have ever had a bigger lead after 12 games of a Premier League season.

Klopp’s men have collected 10 points from losing positions already this season — more than any other team. On the last seven occasions when they have conceded the opening goal, they have won six and drawn one.

Fitness is one factor but Klopp knows it goes much deeper than that.

“Of course it’s all about that,” he says, tapping the side of his head. “But you can’t just order it and then assume the boys will deliver it. If it was that easy then you could just tell them in the moment when you are 1-0 down with 10 minutes to play, ‘you still have to believe’.

“You have to create something and what we have created all together started long ago. People now talk about it but I already feel uncomfortable talking about it because I don’t take it for granted, not for one second. It’s not that I’m thinking five minutes before we go 1-0 down ‘no problem, you can score’.

“It’s happened more often than not that we’ve come back which is good, very good, but [we are] not allowed to take it for granted. It’s just that because it’s happened so often, psychologically it’s clear. If you do something good then it’s absolutely likely that the next time you do it, it’s likely that it will work out again.

“If you fail at something then you need to convince yourself ‘I can do it’. You have to at least see the chance that it can work out. That’s what the boys have worked for over the past four years. Everything is different now.”

Klopp’s impact on Liverpool’s mindset extends way beyond the dressing room. A fanbase has been energised and fortress Anfield has been rebuilt. Liverpool are unbeaten in 46 home league games dating back to April 2017 – the second-longest run in the club’s history.

It’s a far cry from four years ago when Klopp felt “pretty alone” at the sight of fans leaving early when his side trailed 2-1 to Crystal Palace in the closing stages.

“Just after I came in we spoke about why people leave the stadium early. I never understood it in my life but I can imagine all the issues with traffic,” he says.

“I did it myself when I went to watch games as a manager. I’d leave the stadium 15 minutes from the end and run to the carpark so I could get out. But as a supporter? I didn’t understand that. We had to work a lot on that.

“It’s just to convince yourself that it’s possible. The best way to convince yourself is by doing it and seeing that it works out. But if you try it and it doesn’t work in the first moment and you give up then you have a real problem.

“Do it again, again and again. That’s what happened here. It’s all about the mental strength in moments like this. It’s all about attitude and character. None of that is just given. It’s not like when we are born we are just given this character or this character. It’s all developed through the experiences you make through life.

“We have this story here that we’ve been writing for four years. Some of the players have been here for the full four years, others for less. They all realise that we can do what we do in a specific way because we get so much power from outside — from the club, from the crowd, from the history.

“We spoke about history when I came in and that it could be a burden. Now it looks like (claps hands), it feels more like a trampoline. You can jump and jump again. That all changed. How we changed it? I have no idea. We just worked since the first day on it because it was always clear that you need to create a mood where it’s easier to perform than in the mood the club was in when I arrived.”

Klopp’s squad is littered with examples of players who had to battle in the face of adversity and overcome difficulties to reach the highest level.

“Yeah for sure that helps,” he continued. “It means you learn to fight pretty early in your life. You want something that a lot of people would say is not possible. You have to stay stubborn and say ‘no, it is possible, I want to try it, I want to do it’.

“There are some players who everyone saw at the first moment and thought ‘oh, that’s so special’. But the biggest player in the world nowadays, probably Lionel Messi, when he was a kid he was pretty little so no-one thought he could get the physicality to be ready for professional football. Obviously, he made his way.

“That’s the story — it shows to everyone that it is possible. But without luck in decisive moments, you still have no chance. The right people need to see you in the right moments, in the right games to think ‘yes, I see something in him’. We are not completely alone responsible for our careers. We always need to get picked by people.”

There’s a shelf in Klopp’s office where a copy of James Milner’s new book ‘Ask A Footballer’ sits alongside pots of chewing gum and a couple of Liverpool FC branded caps. There’s also a DVD of BBC drama ‘Care’ written by Liverpool-born Jimmy McGovern.

On the opposite wall there’s a nod to past glories with a collection of black and white framed photos of Anfield icons Shankly and Bob Paisley. His desk which looks out over Melwood’s training pitches is at the far end.

With so much focus on the emotion and passion that Klopp brings to the job, the attention to detail of the man crowned FIFA Coach of the Year for 2019 is often overlooked. He prides himself on the marginal gains that have been made through the appointment of personnel like head of nutrition Mona Nemmer and throw-in coach Thomas Gronnemark.

Klopp surrounds himself with specialists in their particular fields and The Athletic can exclusively reveal that Liverpool brought on board another one last summer.

Sports psychologist Lee Richardson has been working with the club’s players since July and has his own office at Melwood where he’s based for three days each week.

The former Watford, Blackburn Rovers and Aberdeen midfielder was recruited from Hull City by Liverpool’s medical rehabilitation and performance manager Phil Jacobsen.

Richardson had a brief stint in management with Chesterfield a decade ago before changing careers. He has previously been part of Sam Allardyce’s staff as psychologist for West Ham and then Crystal Palace.

During Brendan Rodgers’ reign, Liverpool secured the services of sports psychiatrist Steve Peters, who was credited with helping cyclists Sir Chris Hoy and Victoria Pendleton achieve Olympic success.

However, that partnership ended shortly after Klopp’s arrival in 2015. In recent years Liverpool utilised the services of performance psychologist Yvie Ryan. A popular and respected figure around the club, she now works on a part-time basis with the academy teams in Kirkby.

“Now we have Rico,” Klopp confirmed. “He was a player, then a manager and then he studied sports psychology. He’s working for us which is great.

“He works very specifically with the boys and I have no idea what they are talking about. I am not interested. It’s just a nice add on.

“It’s just for us the next step. It’s difficult to find the right people with how I see it in that part of the business. Now we feel pretty good with him on board and that’s cool.”

Whereas Peters needed to feel that he was central to everything at Liverpool, Richardson is content with a more ad hoc role. Going to see him is purely optional for the players and he isn’t involved on match days.

It’s a better fit for Klopp’s style of management. In reality, when it comes to personnel delivering on the field, Klopp himself is Liverpool’s psychologist.

“I don’t know what the boys think but yes, I’m responsible for that,” he says.

“When it comes to performing, physical investment, stuff like this, how much they want to do instead of how much they have to do — that’s my job, that’s how I understand it.

“If that’s psychology, I have no idea, I’ve never thought about it like that. Of course, I must be influential in their thinking process.

“It takes time to create an atmosphere where players listen to you like that or where players tell you about some issues. My job is to watch them constantly and to find out what they do and why they do it. If I can understand why they do it then I can be influential. If I don’t know why they do things then I have no clue.

“That’s why I say when we win the players are responsible, when we lose I am responsible. That’s how I see it. If we lose then it means my message didn’t come across. It’s my job to make sure they understand it. For me to ensure they understand it, I need to know as much as I can about them.

“I already have the issue with my language. If I have another issue with understanding the boys then we have got a problem. Knowing more about the players is the biggest help I can get.”

For someone who isn’t a native speaker, Klopp has a remarkable knack of finding the right words at the right times.

After Liverpool overhauled a 3-0 first-leg deficit in stunning fashion to beat Barcelona in the semi-finals of the Champions League back in May, a number of his players referenced the inspirational speech he had delivered in the team meeting at the city’s Hope Street Hotel before the coach left for Anfield.

“The world outside is saying it is not possible,” he told them. “And let’s be honest, it’s probably impossible. But because it’s you? Because it’s you, we have a chance.”

Captain Jordan Henderson recalled: “The players could see that the manager believed which helped us believe in what he said. The manager has ingrained that belief into us: no matter what happens you keep fighting right to the end.”

Asked about working with Klopp, striker Roberto Firmino said: “Jurgen motivates us in a different way every day.”

Where does it come from? A smile creeps across Klopp’s face.

“Sorry, I would write a book about the things I do if I knew why I did them,” he says.

“But I could never write a book because I have no clue about how these things work. I just react in situations. My job, my life is 24/7 thinking about what happens here.

“The training sessions are one-and-a-half hours or two hours a day. There are still 22 hours left! There are so many things that influence the boys.

“The meetings are based on our past if you want — what happened after the last game, what happened yesterday, things like this. What can we use? I always react.

“I don’t usually remember what I say. If the boys didn’t say things in the press afterwards then I wouldn’t even know I’d said it. I remember Divock Origi after the Dortmund game (in the quarter-final of the Europa League in 2016 when Liverpool fought back from 3-1 down to win 4-3). He said: ‘The boss told us at half-time that if we turned the game around it would be a story we’d all be able to tell our grandchildren about so it would be really worth giving it a try.’

“But if it was that easy I’d tell them things like that constantly! We always want stories to tell the grandkids! When we start a team meeting the only thing I really know what I am going to say is the first sentence.”

Really? So the rest is just off the cuff?

“All that happens through the week, it stays in my mind, I don’t write anything down,” he explains. “I just think about what’s worth telling the boys. Shit session, very good session, whatever, little things. I know how it sounds and it should not sound like this — like I know always to say the right words. But I do trust myself 100 per cent to find the right words.

“I only know the first sentence. I am not nervous because I don’t know yet the second sentence. I always realise after a meeting that I sweat here [he points to his brow]. That’s when I feel the intensity of the meeting. I don’t realise that it’s intense until the drops come down my face and I think ‘it’s not that warm’. I am obviously pretty much ‘in it’.

“If the meeting before a game was the only moment when we speak about football then it would take two-and-a-half hours. But it’s only 10 to 15 minutes max. Most of the things are already said.

“It’s about repeating the things we’ve said during the week. Then I think it always makes sense to give the boys a little hint about why it’s so worth it, why it’s so valuable to do it more intense than others.

“We all have to come in a mood where we can reach the highest. You cannot get up in the morning at 8am having got pissed the night before and try to climb the Rocky Mountains or Mount Everest. It’s just not possible. We have to come in a mood where we say ‘now this step, now that step’. That’s what we try to create constantly.”


Klopp, The Athletic, and one massive bowl of fruit and yoghurt…
Sports psychology formed part of the diploma in sports science that Klopp completed at Goethe University Frankfurt during his playing career with Mainz in the mid-1990s.

It was a topic that legendary German manager Wolfgang Frank was passionate about. Frank, who had two spells as Mainz boss, was a huge influence on Klopp’s move into coaching but he didn’t always follow his orders.

“Yeah, Wolfgang was constantly reading books,” Klopp says. “He actually told us players that we had to spend at least 10 per cent of our wages on books about psychology. I never bought one!

“To be honest, we had players that even if the books they bought had been the other way around, they wouldn’t have known any different. They didn’t even understand the titles! They just got them because the boss told us to do it.

“I only read what I needed to read to prepare for my final diploma exam. I remember going to see the professor in sports psychology. I opened the door and he said from his desk ‘if you want to talk about motivation get out of my office!’

“Everyone wanted to make the exam about motivation. I had ‘mo…’ on my lips actually but I said: ‘oh no, I actually want to talk about something else…’ I didn’t read many books about psychology to be honest. If there were more books about common sense then I would probably read them.

“If you ask me ‘do you have a strength?’ I’d say it’s not my right foot, not my left foot, I’m not really smart but common sense? Yes. I can really judge things in the right way — as long as I’m not emotionally involved like during a game.

“Before and after a game, I’m completely in the middle. If you tell me about a problem, I’ll be able to tell you if it’s really serious or not and how you can deal with it. That’s one of my strengths. It was always like this. That’s my thing — common sense more than psychology. Make the big things big and leave the small things small.”

Win or lose, Klopp says little to his players in the dressing room immediately after games. He prefers to wait until the dust has settled. The real debriefs take place at Melwood the following morning.

“There’s no need straight after,” he explains. “We have two, maybe three minutes max.

“What I say straight after a game is very spontaneous and brief — very good or very bad is easy. Mediocre isn’t too interesting so we can talk about that the next day.

“Straight after a game you are emotionally involved but it’s also that you are too busy. Players are off doing media or drugs tests. When you want to say the right things, you should think about it and I have no time to think about it at that time.

“I don’t need to read newspapers to know if we were good or bad. I know that before I read anything. I tell them that the only opinion that really counts is my opinion. The day after is when I tell the boys how it was and why it was.”

It’s a measure of what Klopp has created that he rarely has to contend with any dissenting voices. Even those on the fringes with limited game-time feel like they are part of something special at Liverpool.

A desire to protect and enhance that unity and spirit is one of the reasons why the 52-year-old prefers to operate with a relatively small senior squad.

“There’s a lot of responsibility on the boys themselves. A person who doesn’t want to feel needed, I cannot help,” Klopp says.

“If you play in the first XI and it’s ‘yeah!’ or if you don’t play and it’s ‘oh, you can all fuck off’ then you cannot exist in this kind of environment, it’s not possible.

“Yes, I get that it feels different if you haven’t played but you must always be ready for the moment when you come on and stuff like this.

“How do I keep them motivated? I treat them all the same, 100 per cent. You score four goals or no goals, for me you are the same person. When we talk about football it’s easier for me to speak with the guy who scored four goals, but on a personal level they’re all the same for me.

“I like them all a lot — that’s why they are all here. It’s not that anyone has forced me to get around with these guys. They are all wonderful, different but wonderful. I like being around them. Hopefully, they know that and they feel that.

“They know that if you are at a club like Liverpool you want to play all the games until you are injured. Then that doesn’t work! We have to make sure we go through the season with as few injuries as possible.

“First and foremost, we have to win football games. At a club like Liverpool, you are expected to win pretty much every three days. For that we need more than 11 players so that makes it easier keeping 17 or 18 players happy with appearances. If we had 22 or 23 then it gets more complicated.”

Over the course of this interview, there are knocks on the door from head physio Lee Nobes and head of fitness and conditioning Andreas Kornmayer. You can guarantee that they wanted to discuss the various states of fitness that the club’s international contingent have returned to Melwood in.

This is Klopp’s life. He’s always dealing with problems and challenges. His door is always open for staff and players alike. Does he ever find it draining?

“No, this for me is absolutely energy-giving, not energy-taking, 100 per cent,” he says.

“Life is all about these things. I like being alone. I have no problem with being alone sometimes but actually I love having people around, speaking to them, listening to them. I enjoy much more because I really think that listening to people is the best teacher in life in general.

“The best thing is to listen to smart people. Not all people are smart but it’s still interesting. I really constantly try to understand the people I have to deal with.

“It’s not at all draining. It’s actually pretty much the best part of my job to be around these guys and to have the opportunity to help them and get the best out of them.

“That’s the plan of a career — to make the best career you can make. Only some of us will know that it was the best career we could get. All the others will be a little bit in doubt in terms of ‘if only I’d done more here or there’. Coming close to your personal perfect career — that’s my target for the boys.”

Can Klopp ever truly switch off?

“I would say yes, Ulla would probably say no,” he laughs.

“But I’m much better. On holiday in the summer, if it’s say four weeks, then I’d say the first week is difficult and the last week is difficult. But in between, yes I can completely switch off.”

But what about being able to savour a victory? It was telling that when Klopp faced the media straight after Liverpool’s win over title rivals Manchester City he was bemoaning the lack of preparation time he would have for this weekend’s trip to Crystal Palace. Even after such a statement triumph, he was immediately looking to the next hurdle that needed to be cleared rather than living in the moment.

“Yes because I hate the internationals! From a personal point of view, I just hate it,” he says.

“Sadio Mane played in Swaziland (for Senegal). You know nothing about games like this. He went off straight after half-time and you are thinking ‘oh’. These are the situations that kill me, to be honest.

“It’s just not knowing about what is exactly happening, trying to find out what we can do, what we have to do. As soon as Sadio got a phone we could get in contact but he’s the player, he’s not the guy who organises everything else around it. Dealing with things like this is not cool.

“That’s why the last game before an international break is always difficult for me. The final whistle goes and then I’m thinking ‘now they leave’. That’s the biggest problem in my working life.

“You know the best game of the season so far for me to enjoy? It was Arsenal in the Carabao Cup (when a youthful Liverpool line up fought back from 4-2 down to win 5-4 on penalties after a thrilling 5-5 draw).

“When we were 3-1 down I was thinking ‘come on, don’t give them a knock, don’t lose 4-1 or 5-1 as that wouldn’t be nice’. Then we started scoring again. That was my game to enjoy. I don’t have that a lot.

“The boys made it a special night and I loved it. The atmosphere was brilliant and buzzing. We’ve had a lot of good moments at Anfield.”

Liverpool will need plenty more good moments if they are going to end the club’s painful 30-year wait for English football’s top-flight crown.

Winning the title isn’t so much a target as an obsession on Merseyside. Supporters crave it so much that the emotion can become overwhelming. Last season Liverpool agonisingly missed out to City by a solitary point — a club record 97-point haul was in vain — before rallying to lift the European Cup in Madrid.

This time around Klopp’s men find themselves in a position of strength domestically and the manager knows that holding their nerve will go a long way to deciding the outcome.

“The difference is not too big to last season,” he insists.

“I know people will get nervous. Everybody thinks we need to win all the games otherwise they will catch us. But in those moments when people imagine that, they think the other teams won’t drop any more points themselves.

“Last season City didn’t lose any games anymore when we were both fighting for the title. But that doesn’t mean it will be like this again. Last season was very helpful for the future of all of us. We were completely concentrated on a specific game. We knew we had to win it.

“The Champions League final, going there with my personal history in finals, not too cool, and the history of the team with losing the final the year before, not too cool. But if you use history in the right way then it can always help.

“We’re all human beings and it’s natural to have doubts. I was actually afraid of the three or four hours alone in the hotel room before the final because I’d have no interaction with anyone. Usually, I’d just sit there on the chair or on the bed and prepare.

“But on the day of the final I went in my room and I slept for two hours. I surprised myself. I woke up and I was still in a good mood. I have no clue why that happened. It’s not that I forced myself to be in a good mood. I was just really looking forward to the game.

“It comes down to the faith and the trust I have in these boys. Not that we will make it because you can’t guarantee that but that we will make the best out of it. I was really positive before the game. It was so nice.”

His players repaid that faith in abundance on the biggest of stages and they have continued in similar fashion since. With the Super Cup already added to the Champions League and next month’s Club World Cup on the horizon, the stage is set for a golden era. This is Liverpool’s time.

“The experiences we’ve had certainly help,” Klopp adds.

“Last season showed us again that we have to keep going until the last matchday. If you look throughout my career, you will see that I’ve pretty much always gone until the last matchday. It’s unbelievable.

“When we became German champions with Dortmund it was the third to last match day but there was a cup final still to come at the end of the season.

“It’s always until the bitter end. Ulla doesn’t like that too much but that’s part of my career. I should get used to it. We always try to squeeze out everything that we possibly can.”

Time is up. Klopp has staff to liaise with and an afternoon training session to oversee. The relentless pursuit of perfection goes
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Old Today, 07:02 PM   #7275
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That one I will read
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Old Today, 07:03 PM   #7276
Shaggy
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Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 127,210
Fuck me that is long
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I was playing doctors and nurses with my female cousin. I was about 6 or 7, and we were inserting little toy stuffs in our bum holes. Does it count as snogging?
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